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Hazardous Material Clean Up

Our trained technicians and staff stay up to date on all aspects of Hazardous material clean up and containment. Aces approaches all HAZ and environmental clean-ups with the thought of returning the contaminated are to its per existing state. ACES will get the job done rapidly and safely so you can get back to operating.

What Are Hazardous Materials?

A hazardous material (Asbestos, Lead, Mold) is any item or agent (biological, chemical, radiological, and/or physical), which has the potential to cause harm to humans, animals, or the environment, either by itself or through interaction with other factors. Hazardous materials professionals are responsible for and properly qualified to manage such materials. This includes managing and/or advising other managers on hazardous materials at any point in their life-cycle, from process planning and development of new products; through manufacture, distribution and use; and to disposal, cleanup and remediation.

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OSHA's definition includes any substance or chemical which is a "health hazard" or "physical hazard," including: chemicals which are carcinogens, toxic agents, irritants, corrosives, sensitizers; agents which act on the hematopoietic system; agents which damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes; chemicals which are combustible, explosive, flammable, oxidizers, pyrophorics, unstable-reactive or water-reactive; and chemicals which in the course of normal handling, use, or storage may produce or release dusts, gases, fumes, vapors, mists or smoke which may have any of the previously mentioned characteristics. (Full definitions can be found at 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.1200.)

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How Are They Defined?

Hazardous materials are defined and regulated in the United States primarily by laws and regulations administered by U.S. Organizations such as: 

  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  • The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

  • The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)

  • The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 

Each has its own definition of a "hazardous material."

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